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Literature, Film, Television and Theatre

 

 
This semester’s theme is films that focus on personal journeys, whether physical or emotional, that have captured audiences with the portrayals of desire, danger, patience, and success or failure.  Film screenings will include six of the following movies: Closely Watched Trains (1966), Ida (2013), Awakenings (1990), Les Innocents (1987), Sweet and Lowdown (1999), Cría Cuervos (Raise Ravens) (1976), Eternity and a Day (1998), Locke (2013), Brokeback Mountain (2005), Sundays and Cybèle (1962).

Schedule : Weekly - Tue 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM; 6 sessions; starting 3/20/2018, ending 5/1/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/3/2018)

Tuition: $120.00

Location : Hitchcock Presbyterian Church Location : 
  Hitchcock Presbyterian Church.

Instructor : Marilyn DeRight 



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This course focuses on poetry that addresses current issues of environmental change.  Appreciation of nature, including nostalgic and romantic views, has long been a staple of poetry.  Today, many contemporary poets are taking an activist stance, alert to environmental issues and the ways in which their poems might affect public policy.  We will discuss their different voices, as well as the new field of eco-poetics, and read poems that portray environmental risks and urge repair.  Issues to be considered include style and form of the poems, their grounding in environmental science, and similarities and differences with the influence of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring.  For a broad view of poetry that speaks to and for the natural world, see Can Poetry Save the Earth? by John Felstiner (Yale, 2009).  All welcome in this poetry discussion series.

Schedule : Weekly - Tue 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM; 5 sessions; starting 3/20/2018, ending 4/24/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/3/2018)

Tuition: $150.00

Location : Hitchcock Presbyterian Church Location : 
  Hitchcock Presbyterian Church.

Instructor : Ruth Handel 



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This class will read and discuss a dozen (two each week) varied, quality short stories that originally appeared in The New Yorker, a dependable source of talented writers.  Whether familiar or new, all selections will offer the pleasure of lively discussion.  Readings will be taken from the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker, edited by David Remnick with Susan Choi (Random House, 2000, available in paperback).  For the first class, please read Laurie Colwin’s “Another Marvelous Thing” and Jonathan Franzen’s “The Failure.”  Try to read each story twice, looking carefully at plot structure, character presentation, language and total effect.  

Schedule : Weekly - Wed 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM; 6 sessions; starting 3/21/2018, ending 5/2/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/4/2018)

Tuition: $180.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Marilyn DeRight 



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Each SAS semester, BookTalk introduces readers to a carefully chosen, provocative selection of novels for reading and informal discussion.  In this installment, we will consider the authors’ writing techniques and their characters’ personal journeys.  For the first meeting, please read Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan.  Later classes will be devoted to An Odyssey: A Father, A Son, and an Epic by Daniel Mendelsohn (April 17 and 18), Dark at the Crossing by Elliot Ackerman (May 1 and 2), Less by Andrew Sean Greer (May 15 and 16), and The Signal Flame by Andrew Krivak (May 29 and 30).  

Schedule : Weekly - Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM; 5 sessions; starting 3/27/2018, ending 5/29/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/3/2018, 4/10/2018, 4/24/2018, 5/8/2018, 5/22/2018)

Please read: This class meets on 3/27, 4/17, 5/1, 5/15, ...More

Tuition: $150.00

Location : Teacher's Home In Scarsdale Location : 
  Teacher's Home In Scarsdale.

Instructor : Harriet Sobol 



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This class explores contemporary memoirs by writers from diverse social backgrounds.  How do authors translate lived experiences of childhood and family life, immigration, war, personal trauma, work and professional life, parenthood, and politics into compelling literary works?  How do they chronicle the creation of complex identities shaped by race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and geography?  Analyzing both the achievements and the limitations of the memoir genre, we will discuss how authors map the emotional landscape of private life while addressing broader themes in history, politics, and culture. This class features four very recent books, including a beautifully rendered graphic memoir.)  Come share your ideas with other passionate readers in a stimulating yet relaxed environment.  Reading list: The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me, by Sherman Alexie, Real American by Julie Lythcott-Haims, and Hunger by Roxane Gay.    

Schedule : Weekly - Wed 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM; 4 sessions; starting 3/28/2018, ending 6/13/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/4/2018, 4/11/2018, 4/18/2018, 5/2/2018, 5/9/2018, 5/23/2018, 5/30/2018, 6/6/2018)

Please read: Class meets on: Four Wednesdays, 3/28, ...More

Tuition: $120.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Lori Rotskoff 



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Each SAS semester, BookTalk introduces readers to a carefully chosen, provocative selection of novels for reading and informal discussion.  In this installment, we will consider the authors’ writing techniques and their characters’ personal journeys.  For the first meeting, please read Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan.  Later classes will be devoted to An Odyssey: A Father, A Son, and an Epic by Daniel Mendelsohn (April 17 and 18), Dark at the Crossing by Elliot Ackerman (May 1 and 2), Less by Andrew Sean Greer (May 15 and 16), and The Signal Flame by Andrew Krivak (May 29 and 30).  

Schedule : Weekly - Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM; 6 sessions; starting 3/28/2018, ending 5/30/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/4/2018, 4/11/2018, 4/25/2018, 5/23/2018)

Please read: This class meets on 3/28, 4/18, 5/2, 5/16, ...More

Tuition: $150.00

Location : Teacher's Home In Scarsdale Location : 
  Teacher's Home In Scarsdale.

Instructor : Harriet Sobol 



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Each SAS semester, BookTalk introduces readers to a carefully chosen, provocative selection of novels for reading and informal discussion.  In this installment, we will consider the authors’ writing techniques and their characters’ personal journeys.  For the first meeting, please read Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan.  Later classes will be devoted to An Odyssey: A Father, A Son, and an Epic by Daniel Mendelsohn (April 17 and 18), Dark at the Crossing by Elliot Ackerman (May 1 and 2), Less by Andrew Sean Greer (May 15 and 16), and The Signal Flame by Andrew Krivak (May 29 and 30).  

Schedule : Weekly - Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM; 5 sessions; starting 4/10/2018, ending 6/5/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/17/2018, 5/1/2018, 5/15/2018, 5/29/2018)

Please read: This class meets on 4/10, 4/24, 5/8, 5/22, ...More

Tuition: $150.00

Location : Teacher's Home In Scarsdale Location : 
  Teacher's Home In Scarsdale.

Instructor : Harriet Sobol 



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Join cultural historian Lori Rotskoff for a lively, interactive book discussion of Celeste Ng’s new novel Little Fires Everywhere.  Set in the placid suburb of Shaker Heights, Ohio, the story traces the intertwined fates of a picture-perfect family and a mysterious mother and daughter who move to town and upset the status quo of this carefully ordered community.  Developing themes of race, class, motherhood, and belonging through a cast of compelling characters and a suspenseful plot, Ng explores the complexities of modern family life, privacy, and privilege — as well as the explosive potential of untold secrets and the danger of believing that social conformity can prevent disaster.

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM; starting 4/19/2018, ending 4/19/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Lori Rotskoff 



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"The goal that led him on was not impossible, though it was clearly supernatural: he wanted to dream a man.  He wanted to dream him completely, in painstaking detail, and impose him upon reality."  Jorge Luis Borges: "The Circular Ruins." Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) is considered by many to be the greatest Latin American writer.  Cosmopolitan, urbane, multilingual, and erudite, yet rooted in his Argentine past, Borges constructed complex literary puzzles and fantastic situations reminiscent of what would later be called: "magical realism”.  This course will explore the themes, paradoxes, and imagined worlds of the short stories in Borges’s Ficciones (1940) and delve into his understandings of identity and existence.  

Schedule : Weekly - Fri 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM; 6 sessions; starting 5/4/2018, ending 6/8/2018

Tuition: $180.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : John Alise 



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"For whom the bell tolls."  "No man is an island."  "Death be not proud."  Come learn all about the man who penned these well known lines, the metaphysical poet and Anglican priest John Donne.  Read from Donne's poetry and prose, including sermons written as dean of St. Paul's Cathedral in London.  From racy love poems to meditations on mortality, Donne's writing is as varied and interesting as his own life and the period he lived in.  All welcome, whatever your familiarity with Donne, poetry and English history.  

Schedule : Weekly - Mon 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM; 3 sessions; starting 5/7/2018, ending 5/21/2018

Tuition: $90.00

Location : St. James the Less Church Location : 
  St. James the Less Church.

Instructor : Astrid Storm 



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Over a career spanning half of a century, Master of Suspense Alfred Hitchcock directed numerous films that have become an indelible part of cinema, first in his native Britain and later in Hollywood.  Using short clips from his films as well as excerpts from the many interviews “Hitch” gave over his career, we will have an opportunity to examine: memorable scenes from films such as Rear Window, Vertigo, Notorious, and Spellbound; how Hitchcock used various camera and editing techniques to manipulate character identification and the audience’s emotions; and how Hitchcock’s association with graphic artist Saul Bass and composer Bernard Herrmann enabled him to further enhance his films.  

Schedule : Weekly - Wed 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM; starting 5/16/2018, ending 5/16/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Temple Israel New Rochelle Location : 
  Temple Israel New Rochelle.

Instructor : Richard Knox 



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This five-session course will cover poetry and plays penned in Irish and English from William Butler Yeats.  We will take an in-depth look at Yeats' extraordinary body of work: poems and plays. We will also consider why the critical response to his plays has often not equaled the response to his poems.  Any edition of Collected Poems of Yeats is fine; read as many as you can, in advance! The plays we'll read are : Deirdre, Cathleen ni Houlihan, and The Cat and the Moon.   

Schedule : Weekly - Fri 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM; 5 sessions; starting 6/29/2018, ending 8/3/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 7/6/2018)

Tuition: $150.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Estha Weiner 



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